WHO lauds Healthy Cities' Program implemented by Taibah University    Saudi Arabia ranks 14th globally in publishing coronavirus' researches, tops Arab countries    Al Suwailem: Hydrogen plays an important role in the zero-carbon energy system Shabaneh: The COVID-19 pandemic enhanced hydrogen initiatives around the world    US oil products demand is set for an additional 350,000 bpd ‘Biden boost' in 2021    Connecting KAUST at the speed of science    Global coronavirus cases hits 98.9m; death toll crosses 2.1m    McIlroy wrestles back lead in Abu Dhabi    S. Korea Confirms Two More Cases of Highly Pathogenic Bird Flu    South Korea Reports 431 New Coronavirus Cases    KSrelief's Mobile Medical Clinics Continue Providing Treatment Services, in Hajjah, Yemen    KSrelief Continues Implementing Project to Improve Livelihoods of Orphans, in Marib, Yemen    Legendary talk show host Larry King dies at 87    KSrelief Continues Implementing Water Supply, Environmental Sanitation Project, in Hodeida Governorate, Yemen    MWL Honors Winners of Annual Competition for Memorizing Holy Quran in Pakistan    IRENA members endorse launch of Global High-Level Forum on Energy Transition    COVID ‘vaccine hoarding' putting Africa at risk: WHO    Mali in transition: UN peacekeeping chief takes stock of political and security developments    Criminal elements in Colombia use violence to ‘stamp out' leaders' voices    Winter Season in Hail ... an adventure, a culture, and a history    CAR: UN mission chief appeals for more peacekeepers    Wall Street Closing    Saudi Press: Saudi Arabia Always Seeks to Promote A Culture of Peace And Tolerance    Real Madrid coach Zidane tests positive for COVID-19    Ryder Cup stars go feet first to support world neglected tropical diseases charity    Hatton storms to lead in Abu Dhabi    Intellectual Property Authority Seizes 11,620 Articles Violating Creative Rights, 77 Websites Violating Intellectual Property Systems During January    Saudi Stock Exchange Main Index Ends Trading Lower, at 8,876.49 Points    Saudi Ports Achieve 6% Increase in Transshipment during December 2020    SAGO Issues Tender to Import 480,000 Tons of Barley    SR40mn funding for 28 Saudi cinematic projects    Film Commission Launches 28 Cinematic Projects for Winners of Daw' Film Competition    Healthy diets ‘nearly impossible' for 1.9bn people in Asia-Pacific: UN report    SASCA sets a deadline for receiving participations in International Video Art Forum    SASCA in Dammam Sets a Deadline for Receiving Participations in International Video Art Forum    French Driver Peterhansel Wins Dakar Rally Saudi Arabia 2021    Rangers win Old Firm derby, 50 years since Ibrox disaster    Dakar Saudi Arabia 2021 Rally to fully Kick off for 13-Day on Sunday    Saudi Film Commission Opens Registration Doors for Digital Filmmakers' Program    Dakar Saudi Arabia 2021 Rally to Kick off, on Saturday    Saudi Arabia Names " Scales" Film to Represent it in Oscars    Council of Senior Scholars: Muslim Brothers' Group Don't Represent Method of Islam, rather only Follows its Partisan Objectives, Violating our Graceful Religion    Court facilitates young woman's marriage after stripping father's guardianship    Bahrain's top Islamic body condemns attempts to insult Muslim symbols    Saudi man accused of harassing foreign wife asked to be produced before court Court allows divorce, custody of children by mother    S. P. Bala, legendary Indian singer, dead at 74    Eid Al-Adha Prayer Performed at the Grand Holy Mosque    Pilgrims Perform Dhuhr and Asr Prayers in Arafat Holy Site    Senior Scholars Council Issues Decision No. 246 Regarding Attendance of Friday Prayer and Prayers at Mosques in a Case of Spread of Epidemic or Fear of its Spread    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





Can reefs survive climate change?
Published in The Saudi Gazette on 07 - 03 - 2011

WAKATOBI, Indonesia: Red anthia fish and rainbow-colored wrasse dart among the glittering reefs of Indonesia's Wakatobi archipelago, as eagle rays and barracudas cruise past in the blue depths.
It's hard to believe Wakatobi is anything but a thriving marine paradise, packing a bewildering abundance of life that supports 100,000 people and contributes millions of dollars to Indonesia's economy.
But scientists are worried.
Last year, coral bleaching caused by higher sea temperatures wreaked havoc across the Coral Triangle, a region of rich tropical reefs spanning much of Southeast Asia and almost all of Indonesia.
Up to 70 percent of the coral in Wakatobi, off the southeastern tip of Sulawesi island, was totally or partially bleached. In Aceh province, off the northern tip of Sumatra, as much as 90 percent was killed, scientists said.
Experts from environmental groups The Nature Conservancy and WWF, as well as the Indonesian government, returned to Wakatobi last month to see if the marine park's reefs had bounced back.
Over two weeks of diving at sites with names like Table Coral City and Blue Hole, the team looked for signs of long-term damage or resilience, in the hope of learning more about how reef systems respond to climate-related stresses. “In Aceh about 90 percent of the coral bleached, and that included some of the really big varieties that are hundreds of years old and had survived the (2004) tsunami but died because of the bleaching,” said Joanne Wilson, deputy director for science in TNC's Indonesia Marine Program. “Very fortunately in Wakatobi ... it seems that only about five to 10 percent of the corals actually died. We're very lucky here.”
Bleaching occurs when corals respond to stress, such as stronger than normal direct sunlight or elevated sea temperatures, by expelling the algae that live inside them and give them their brilliant colors.
In normal conditions the symbiotic algae provide the corals with nutrients, and without them the corals turn white and can die within days. They may also recover, depending on the circumstances.
Wilson described the “eerie” experience of diving on wintry, frozen-looking reefs during the height of the bleaching at Wakatobi last year, the warmest year on record. “I saw that a lot of the corals were affected by the bleaching to various stages. Some were completely white but still alive,” she said.
Scientists feared a repeat of the 1998-1999 global bleaching that was linked to the El Nino and La Nina weather cycles in the Pacific Ocean.
About 16 percent of the world's reefs died in that crisis, providing a wake-up call to scientists about the dangers posed to reef systems — and the millions of people who depend on them — from global warming. Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, the director of the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland in Australia, said the effects of El Nino and La Nina were being magnified by “background warming” linked to general climate change. “Over the next five to 10 years, we will probably return to fairly serious bleaching conditions,” he said.
A study by two dozen conservation and research groups led by World Resources International released last month said that without quick action to arrest global warming and reduce other human impacts, the world's reefs could be wiped out by 2050, with grave implications for humanity as a whole.


Clic here to read the story from its source.