GCC Secretary-General Meets with Minister of State for Foreign Affairs of Bangladesh at Davos Forum    Saudi physics team wins 3 global awards in 2022 European Olympiad    SDRPY launches project to rehabilitate Haijat Al-Abed road    KSrelief Conducts 300 Surgeries as Part of Voluntary Medical Project to Combat Blindness in Al-Mukalla    SAMA governor, CMA chairman thank Saudi leadership for approving FinTech strategy    NDMC Closes the May 2022 Issuance under Saudi Arabian Government SAR-denominated Sukuk Program    Crown Prince discusses relations with members of US Congress    SFDA warns against Jif peanut butter products    KSrelief Participates in High-Level Regional Meeting on Youth    Women's green futsal team wins bronze in Gulf Games    Saudi Stock Exchange Main Index Ends Trading Higher at 12,300.86 Points    Cabinet to continue implementing initiatives and reforms to achieve Vision 2030 objectives    DCO, WEF launch initiative to boost global digital FDI flows    Uganda Supports Saudi Arabia's Bid to Host World Expo 2030    Aramco can't expand output capacity any faster, says CEO Amin Nasser warns of oil crunch    Consensus needed over digital technology for 'people and the planet'    International community urged to support new administration in Somalia    Global jobs market recovery 'has gone into reverse', warns UN labor agency    Saudi Press: Saudi Arabia Exerts Exceptional Efforts to Achieve Security and Stability in Yemen    Appeals court affirms termination of Wafa Insurance's financial restructuring    Saudi Vice Minister of Defense Visits CENTCOM Headquarters    In a Report to SPA .. SDAIA: Autonomous Vehicles Will Be Commercially Available in World by 2030, Will Account for 50% of Sales after 2045    Manchester City clinches Premier League title on dramatic final day    How Syrian singer Rasha Rizk dazzled millennials at Jeddah Season?    King Salman Park begins construction on its Royal Arts Complex    Shoura members propose equal blood money for men and women, Muslim and non-Muslim    KSrelief's Masam Project Dismantles 1,339 Mines within a Week in Yemen    British Investors Express Interest in Investing in Saudi Arabia's Food, Drug Market    7 Die in Philippine Ferry Fire; over 120 Rescued from Water    Ithra Participates in Cannes Film Festival with New Films to Support Saudi Talents    Exclusive launching of Michael Schumacher Digital Experience at Jeddah F1 Grand Prix    MoH allows 6 categories to receive second booster dose    Mbappé signs new 3-year PSG deal after rejecting Real Madrid    Saudi Aramco: London Championship to Witness Participation of World's Best Female Golfers    Saudi woman finds out she is male after 20 years    Saudi Arabia Heads to Cannes International Film Festival to Promote Country's Flourishing Industry and Support Emerging Talent on World Stage    President of SAFF Participates in AFC General Assembly Meeting    Saudi Athletes Achieve Great Victories in the 2nd Day of the GCC Games Tournament in Kuwait    Jazan Hosts West Asian Beach Soccer Championship    Bollywood actor's tweet reignited debate over Hindi as India's national language    SFDA Advises to Wash Dates Well Before Eating    SFDA Advises Against Mixing Surplus of Iftar and Suhoor with Different Foods or Surplus from Other Days    Ministry calls on imams to avoid long supplications in Tahajjud Prayer    Nothing wrong with a Muslim celebrating birthdays, says Saudi scholar    Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques addresses citizens and all Muslims on the occasion of the Holy month of Ramadan    Pilgrims Perform Dhuhr and Asr Prayers at Arafat Holy Site    Council of Senior Scholars: Muslim Brothers' Group Don't Represent Method of Islam, rather only Follows its Partisan Objectives, Violating our Graceful Religion    Eid Al-Adha Prayer Performed at the Grand Holy Mosque    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.



More research needed into COVID-19 effects on children: WHO chief
Published in The Saudi Gazette on 17 - 09 - 2020

More research is needed into factors that increase the risk of severe COVID-19 disease among children and adolescents, the head of the UN World Health Organization (WHO) has said, adding that while children may have largely been spared many of the most severe effects, they have suffered in other ways.
Joining the heads of the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), at a press conference on Tuesday, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus outlined that since the start of the COVID pandemic, understanding its effects on children has been a priority.
"Nine months into the pandemic, many questions remain, but we are starting to have a clearer picture. We know that children and adolescents can be infected and can infect others," he said.
"We know that this virus can kill children, but that children tend to have a milder infection and there are very few severe cases and deaths from COVID-19 among children and adolescents."
According to WHO data, less than 10 percent of reported cases and less than 0.2 percent of deaths are in people under the age of 20. However, additional research is needed into the factors that put children and adolescents at an increased risk.
In addition, the potential long-term health effects in those who have been infected remains unknown.
Referring to closure of schools around the world, which has hit millions of children, impacting not only their education but also a range of other important services, the WHO Director-General said that the decision to close schools should be a last resort, temporary and only at a local level in areas with intense transmission.
Keeping classrooms open, 'a job for all of us'
The time during which schools are closed should be used for putting in place measures to prevent and respond to transmission when schools reopen.
"Keeping children safe and at school is not a job for schools alone, or governments alone or families alone. It's a job for all of us, working together," added Tedros.
"With the right combination of measures, we can keep our kids safe and teach them that health and education are two of the most precious commodities in life," he added.
Guidance on reopening schools, while keeping children and communities safe
Although children have largely been spared many of the most severe health effects of the virus, they have suffered in other ways, said Director-General Tedros, adding that closure of schools hit millions of children globally.
Given different situations among countries: some, where schools have opened and others, where they have not, UNESCO, UNICEF and WHO, issued updated guidance on school-related public health measures in the context of COVID-19.
Based on latest scientific evidence, the guidance provides practical advice for schools in areas with no cases, sporadic cases, clusters of cases or community transmission. They were developed with input from the Technical Advisory Group of Experts on Educational Institutions and COVID-19, established by the three UN agencies in June.
Schools provide critical, diverse services
Audrey Azoulay, UNESCO Director-General, also highlighted the importance of school, not only for teaching, but also for providing health, protection and — at times — nutrition services.
"The longer schools remain closed, the more damaging the consequences, especially for children from more disadvantaged backgrounds ... therefore, supporting safe reopening of schools must be a priority for us all," she said.
In addition to safely reopening schools, attention must focus on ensuring that no one is left behind, Azoulay added, cautioning that in some countries, children are missing from classes, amid fears that many — especially girls — may not ever return to schools.
Alongside, ensuring flow of information and adequate communication between teachers, school administrators and families; and defining new rules and protocols, including on roles of and trainings for teachers, managing school schedules, revising learning content, and providing remedial support for learning losses are equally important, she said.
"When we deal with education, the decisions we make today will impact tomorrow's world," said the UNESCO Director-General.
A global education emergency
However, with half the global student population still unable to return to schools, and almost a third of the world's pupils unable to access remote learning, the situation is "nothing short of a global education emergency," said Henrietta Fore, UNICEF Executive Director.
"We know that closing schools for prolonged periods of time can have devastating consequences for children," she added, outlining their increased exposure risk of physical, sexual, or emotional violence.
The situation is even more concerning given the results from a recent UNICEF survey which found that almost a fourth of the 158 countries questioned, on their school reopening plans, had not set a date to allow schoolchildren back to the classrooms.
"For the most marginalized, missing out on school — even if only for a few weeks — can lead to negative outcomes that last a lifetime," warned Fore.
She called on governments to prioritize reopening schools, when restrictions are lifted, and to focus on all the things that children need — learning, protection, and physical and mental health — and ensure the best interest of every child is put first.
And when governments decide to keep schools closed, they must scale up remote learning opportunities for all children, especially the most marginalized.
"Find innovative ways — including online, TV and radio – to keep children learning, no matter what," stressed Fore. — UN News


Clic here to read the story from its source.