Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques: The Kingdom stresses that the world is facing a tremendous challenge in the form of COVID-19 pandemic    Unofficial G20 engagement group — Values 20 launched    First Mack LR Electric model begins service with New York City Department of Sanitation    flyadeal turns three on Saudi Arabia's 90th National Day    Nike lifts S&P 500, Dow ahead of business activity data, US stocks latest report    Expo 2020 celebrates Kingdom's valuable contribution to the largest event to be held in the Arab world    Africa Travel Week secures partnership with Invest Africa    MoHAP marks World Alzheimer's Day, lighting up Dubai Frame in purple    Bahrain Supports Saudi Arabia's Efforts to Avoid an Environmental Catastrophe for Safer Oil Tanker    The UN is not just a building in New York city: Widodo    UAE joins Saudi Arabia in celebrating the Kingdom's 90th National Day    Controversial Brexit bill passes latest stage in UK parliament    COVID-19 foretells cycling boom in India    Navalny discharged from Berlin hospital after poisoning    Tokyo Reports 59 New Virus Cases, Lowest in Almost 3 Months    Renew ‘collective commitment to multilateralism', urges Assembly President    Russia Reports 6,431 New Coronavirus Cases, 150 Deaths    HRH Crown Prince Congratulates President of Guinea-Bissau on Independence Day    Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Congratulates President of Guinea-Bissau on Independence Day    Saudi Press: Saudi Arabia Celebrates 90th Anniversary of its National Day With Comprehensive Development    HyperX releases first Arabic layout keyboard for gaming    Riyadh Ranks the 5th Smart City among G20 Member States' Capitals, on IMD Indicator    Happy National Day 90    Roma given defeat by Serie A for using ineligible player    Sotheby's, Phillips and Ketterer adapt to the new reality    Bahrain Bourse Rises    50 riders to take part in National Day show jumping competition    Abu Dhabi, Israel, forge film ties following peace accord    AlUla Date Festival to Launch Next Month    Air show, fireworks planned for 90th Saudi National Day    My goal is to lift the national football cup: Maram    SGS Signs MoU to Use Best Technologies in Sterilizing Planes and Airports in Saudi Arabia    SAGO Completes Procedures for 6th Barley Tender in 2020    UAE Team Emirates' Pogacar wins the Tour De France    New expat body to help women, kids tackle pandemic trauma    Every work has its fruits, so choose wisely    Wydad appeal over CAF 2019 Champions' final dismissed by CAS    Saudi Youths Transfer Saudi Arabia's Culture via Animation Production    Saudi Scholarship Program to Promote Football Talents, abroad, Co-sign Accord with Spanish Real Sociedad    French Open to allow 11,500 fans per day between the three show courts    Saudi Films' Festival virtual Events Continued    Saudi Films' Festival Events Continue, amid Wide-Scale Cultural Participation    Mediation center contributes to 22% decrease in divorces    Saudi woman seeks to restrain wealthy hubby from remarrying    Eid Al-Adha Prayer Performed at the Grand Holy Mosque    Pilgrims Perform Dhuhr and Asr Prayers in Arafat Holy Site    Senior Scholars Council Issues Decision No. 246 Regarding Attendance of Friday Prayer and Prayers at Mosques in a Case of Spread of Epidemic or Fear of its Spread    Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Addresses Citizens and Muslims on Eid Al-Fitr    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





75 years after the bomb, Hiroshima still chooses ‘reconciliation and hope'
Published in The Saudi Gazette on 06 - 08 - 2020

In a video message delivered to a Peace Memorial Ceremony in Japan on Thursday, UN Secretary-General António Guterres has paid tribute to the victims of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, which devastated the city in 1945.
"Seventy-five years ago, a single nuclear weapon visited unspeakable death and destruction upon this city," he said in his address. "The effects linger to this day."
However, he noted that Hiroshima and its people have chosen not to be characterized by calamity, but instead by "resilience, reconciliation and hope".
As "unmatched advocates for nuclear disarmament", the survivors, known as hibakusha, have turned their tragedy into "a rallying voice for the safety and well-being of all humanity", he said.
Intertwined fate
The birth of the UN in that same year, is inextricably intertwined with the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs that fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
"Since its earliest days and resolutions, the organization has recognized the need to totally eliminate nuclear weapons," Guterres said. Yet, that goal remains elusive.
Dwindling arms control
The web of arms control, transparency and confidence-building instruments established during the Cold War and its aftermath, is fraying, said the UN chief, and 75 years on, the world has yet to learn that nuclear weapons diminish, rather than reinforce security, he warned.
Against the backdrop of division, distrust and a lack of dialogue along with States modernizing their nuclear arsenals and developing new dangerous weapons and delivery systems, he fears that the prospect of a nuclear-weapon-free world "seems to be slipping further from our grasp".
"The risk of nuclear weapons being used, intentionally, by accident or through miscalculation, is too high for such trends to continue," the UN chief added, repeating his call for states to "return to a common vision and path leading to the total elimination of nuclear weapons".
‘Time for dialogue'
While all states can play a positive role, the countries that possess nuclear weapons have a special responsibility: "They have repeatedly committed to the total elimination of nuclear weapons," Guterres reminded.
"Now is the time for dialogue, confidence-building measures, reductions in the size of nuclear arsenals and utmost restraint."
Strengthen disarmament
Calling for the international non-proliferation and disarmament architecture to be safeguarded and strengthened, the UN chief cited next year's Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, as an opportunity for States to "return to this shared vision".
He also looked forward to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons entry into force, along with that of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, which he said, "remains a top priority in order to entrench and institutionalize the global norm against nuclear testing."
Amidst COVID-19
The commemoration took place in the shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic, which the Secretary-General said has exposed so many of the world's fragilities, "including in the face of the nuclear threat".
"The only way to totally eliminate nuclear risk is to totally eliminate nuclear weapons," he spelled out.
"The United Nations and I will continue to work with all those who seek to achieve our common goal: a world free of nuclear weapons," concluded the Secretary-General.
Recommit to disarmament
There truly is no winner in a nuclear war, Tijjani Muhammad-Bande, president of the UN General Assembly, told the ceremony.
"We must recommit to nuclear disarmament for there will never be a justification for the decimation caused by nuclear weapons," he emphasized, urging everyone to "work relentlessly" to do so.
Calling the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons "a milestone agreement" in nuclear disarmament, he called on all member states to sign and ratify it.
"In memory of the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki...let us work together to create the future we want: a future which is free from the existential threat of nuclear weapons," concluded the Assembly president.
Moral compasses
Meanwhile, the head of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test -Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), Lassina Zerbo, said that the devastating blasts continue to "haunt humanity and raises a challenging question: Can we ever escape the destructive instinct that led to these horrific bombings"?
Calling the hibakusha a "forceful moral compass for humanity," he maintained that their pain and stories have made nuclear risk more "perceptible and concrete".
According to Zerbo, the hibakusha have taught that patience, determination and resolution are "indispensable in the long battle towards nuclear disarmament".
"We must finish what we started because what happened in Japan must never happen again," he said, adding, "we must hear them so we can act." — UN News


Clic here to read the story from its source.