AlJadaan: Leaders of Gulf Countries are Keen for Gulf Cooperation Council to Reach Highest Levels of Economic Integration    1.5m clients benefit from digital conveyance of title deeds service    Umrah companies obligated to issue permits for its pilgrims    Saudi Arabia retains its seat in ITU Council by international consensus    RCU launches Safar art exhibition at AlUla airport    Iran's supreme leader blames unrest on US and Israel    Speaker of Shura Council Heads Kingdom's Delegation to 8th G20 Parliamentary Speakers' Summit in Jakarta    Saudi Stock Exchange Main Index Ends Trading Higher at 11,607.96 Points    Saudi Minister of Commerce Heads Delegation to Morocco, Discusses Enhancing Commercial, Investment Relations    Qatar Stock Exchange Ends Trading Higher    Saudi Arabia to host World Petroleum Congress in 2026    Jazan International Forum moots Saudi Coffee Day, Annual Coffee Award    Sultan Humanitarian City wins platinum award at 2022 Patient Safety Congress in Dubai    King, Crown Prince congratulate German president on Unity Day    Brazil election: Lula and Bolsonaro to face run-off    UK chancellor U-turns on plans to scrap tax rate    Record avian flu outbreak sees 48 million birds culled in UK and EU    Fans 'died in the arms' of players in Indonesia stadium crush    Fans of Sydney United 58 condemned for Nazi salutes during Australia Cup final    Tadawul All Share Index Decreases by 0.79%, Equity Market Capitalization Reaches SAR 10,832.85 Billion at End of 1st Nine Months 2022    Asian Shares Mostly Lower    Weather Forecast for Monday    KSrelief Concludes the 11th, 12th Volunteer Program in Zaatari Camp for Syrian Refugees in Jordan    flynas Launches the "Future Engineers Program" for Aircraft Engineering and Maintenance with 300 Saudi Engineers in Its First Batch    Al-Manea: Selling gold in installments is not permissible    MAWANI, Tabadul Sign MoU to Develop New Saudi Ports Management Systems    174 dead in Indonesian football stadium crush    At Least 127 People Killed, 180 Injured at Football Match in Indonesia    15 cups of Saudi coffee in a day are enough!    Riyadh hosts first Saudi Games on Oct. 27    19 women, 2 men qualify as Kingdom's first yogasana referees    Movies return to Kashmir with Hrithik Roshan-starrer    Body of famed US climber found on Mt Manaslu in Himalayas    Yoga introduced to Saudi universities    Islamic Minister Al-Sheikh: Juristic judgment catalyst to salvage Islamic Ummah    Culinary Arts Commission Registers 13 Foods on Slow Food List of Endangered Food    72% of Children Globally have been Victims of Cyber Threats    Saudi National Football Team Continues Preparations for Friendly Match against Ecuador    Saudi Futsal Team Beats San Marino, Wins Silver in Croatian International Championship    During 2nd Global AI Summit.. AI-powered Early Breast Cancer Detection Program Launched    Triple talaq: India Muslim women in limbo after instant divorce ruling    Film Commission Reviews Film Industry Prospects in Saudi Arabia at Venice International Film Festival    Saudi national volleyball team loses to Kyrgyzstan in Asian Challenge Cup final    Saudi national volleyball team beats Uzbekistan, qualifies for the final of the Asian Challenge Cup    Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Delivers Speech to Pilgrims, Citizens, Residents and Muslims around the World    Sheikh Al-Issa in Arafah's Sermon: Allaah Blessed You by Making It Easy for You to Carry out This Obligation. Thus, Ensure Following the Guidance of Your Prophet    Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques addresses citizens and all Muslims on the occasion of the Holy month of Ramadan    Pilgrims Perform Dhuhr and Asr Prayers at Arafat Holy Site    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.



Climate change to batter global fruits, nuts industry
Published in The Saudi Gazette on 30 - 05 - 2011

WASHINGTON: Climate change is expected to alter the global industry in fruits and nuts dramatically as tree crops such as pistachios and cherries struggle in the rising temperatures, researchers said.
A study said that even if polluters took greater action to cut carbon emissions, the impact of climate change will likely be severe enough that the nearly $100 billion-a-year fruit and nut industry needs to reassess planning.
Trees in temperate regions evolved to need a chilly period so they can grow in the spring. Rising temperatures pose a special problem for temperate but comparatively warm areas where the winter chill is already in short supply.
The study, published in May by the online journal PLoS One, expected fruit and nut trees to be highly affected in California, the southeastern United States, China's Yunnan province and southern and southwestern Australia.
Areas that have already seen the worst losses of winter chill include Morocco, Tunisia and the Cape region of South Africa, the study said.
Common fruits and nuts in the warmer temperate areas include pistachios, which are popular in Iran and California, along with walnuts, cherries and peaches.
Co-author Eike Luedeling of the Nairobi-based World Agroforestry Centre said that farmers making long-term investments needed to realize quickly that fruits and nuts are more vulnerable than many other crops.
"If I'm growing wheat or maize, then from one year to the next I can decide whether to plant a little late or plant a little earlier or plant a different variety," Luedeling said.
"But for trees, you can't. Once you've made a decision to plant a certain crop, you're locked in for 30 years," he said.
Luedeling, who observed the problem of declining yields while researching trees in Oman, said that the economic impact of climate change to fruits and nuts would depend on decisions being made now.
"If farmers wake up to the reality of climate change and start making these adjustments – switching to cultivars that are appropriate in the future, but not necessarily now yet – then the disruption to markets could be minimal," he said.
"But if we don't, if farmers believe they can keep doing what their grandfathers have done, then we will see some serious problems," he said.
Climate change is forecast to have less impact on cooler temperate regions and the winter chill may actually increase in some colder regions, the study found.
Co-author Evan Girvetz, a senior climate scientist at The Nature Conservancy, a US environmental group, said cooler regions had a greater window for rising temperatures as they started out with more days of winter chill.
But many warmer areas are "already on that edge of not having enough cold temperatures during the winter for good fruit and nut production," Girvetz said.
"They have years when you don't have enough full production and as we move into the future, we are finding that that's going to become more common," he said.
Even if the world cuts down on greenhouse gas emissions, "we are still projecting that the suitability for growing these crops is likely to decrease," he said.
The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in a major report in 2007 forecast that the world would heat up by 1.8 to 4.0 degrees Celsius (3.2-7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100 compared with pre-industrial levels and that some damage was irreversible.
However, political momentum to fight climate change has since declined, especially in the United States, with a number of conservative lawmakers raising doubts about the science and saying that action is too costly.


Clic here to read the story from its source.